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ABOUT US

Jason Fry and Greg Prince
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

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What's in a Number?

Our co-newest Met is wearing a familiar number.

Flamethrower Edwin Diaz, whom I already appreciated for being really good before discovering his nickname is “Sugar,” will wear 39. That’s no particularly big thing in the annals of Met lore: the first 39 that pops into my head is Gary Gentry, the blueprint for all too many […]

Mets Versus St. Louis

While you’re waiting for 2018 to commence in earnest, or should you find yourself jonesing for compelling content amid the plethora of upcoming off days (why have off days when we just had an offseason?), I suggest treating yourself to some quality streaming, courtesy of Nine Network […]

Don't Miss Out

An Asdrubal Cabrera three-run homer in the 11th to beat the Phillies? What Met fan would say no to that?

Sadly, though, Cabrera’s Saturday night shot will never be more than a faint echo of the one we’ll all remember. That one, off Edubray Ramos, came down the stretch last September, when the Mets were fighting […]

When Recent Proves Relative

Hey now and forever, Michael Conforto, you’re an All-Star, no matter how your league got its game on, no matter that there was a decent case to be made for at least two other players from your team getting your spot. But never mind that Jacob deGrom was the most stellar Met of the first […]

You Can’t Eject the Past

Adam Hamari, a relative stranger to our ongoing narrative since his arrival as a major league umpire in 2013, is now seared into our consciousness as a) the arbiter who arbitrarily deprived 42,000 ticketholders of the opportunity to watch and cheer Noah Syndergaard, premier starting pitcher for the New York Mets, and b) enabler of […]

37 14 41 42 -- And More?

The Braves have announced that they’ll retire No. 10, recently worn by the player forever known in these parts as Larry Jones. The Mets might or might not have a ceremony of their own soon — they’ve been coy about the chances of putting Mike Piazza’s No. 31 on the wall when he’s inducted to […]

Where Everybody Knows You're Shea

“This is the train to Woodside and Penn Station,” the Long Island Rail Road conductor informed us as the westbound 11:04 pulled out of Jamaica on Opening Day. “Change at Woodside for Shea.”

Best advice I’d heard since my iPod’s 1986 playlist was telling me twenty minutes earlier to get Metsmerized, get Metsmerized.

Hello dark plaque, […]

Kid's Last Shea Swing

Video gold from our Mets archivist pal LarryDC:

Right away you get Keith Hernandez’s final Mets plate appearance. At 2:24, Gary Carter catches for the final time at Shea. And seconds later, Kid is swinging in Flushing for the last time. Watch the at-bat and listen to how Steve Zabriskie describes him. Pretty much sums him […]

Digit Double Check

With a handful of numerical matters in the news and the 13th birthday today of Jon Springer’s pioneering Mets By The Numbers site (whose generally uncredited research provides the data for articles like these), I decided this morning to do one of my periodic number spot checks. It works like this: I count up from 1 […]

Talking Gary Carter Tonight

I’ll be on with the guys from Happy Recap radio tonight at 6 to remember the life and Met times of Gary Carter. Other great guests join the show between 5 and 7. You can listen live or to the podcast later here.