The blog for Mets fans
who like to read

ABOUT US

Greg Prince and Jason Fry
Faith and Fear in Flushing made its debut on Feb. 16, 2005, the brainchild of two longtime friends and lifelong Met fans.

Greg Prince discovered the Mets when he was 6, during the magical summer of 1969. He is a Long Island-based writer, editor and communications consultant. Contact him here.

Jason Fry is a Brooklyn writer whose first memories include his mom leaping up and down cheering for Rusty Staub. Check out his other writing here.

Got something to say? Leave a comment, or email us at faithandfear@gmail.com. (Sorry, but we have no interest in ads, sponsored content or guest posts.)

Need our RSS feed? It's here.

Visit our Facebook page, or drop by the personal pages for Greg and Jason.

Or follow us on Twitter: Here's Greg, and here's Jason.

The Mets-Phillies Takeout Special

OK, lemme see if I got all this. You want the pair of Slugger Milestones — the 100th RBI and the 30th homer, wrap them separately. Yeah, those’ll stay cold. They’re Polar.

You want the Speedy Duo with the Double Steal, the back half being the steal of home. You got it. We keep that on […]

First Test Passed

This is the stretch that will send the Mets down one of two postseason roads: a  newfangled bye that advances them to the division series, or a dogfight in the scrum of the wild-card round. Three with the Phillies, four with the Braves, four more with the Phillies, two with the Yankees.

Well, so far so […]

Fearful Symmetry

Let’s get this part out of the way: I was in the front of the Promenade a fair distance down the first-base line. So I can’t tell you jack about Max Scherzer‘s stuff or location or exactly what happened to various Met defenders or anything else that relies on the nuance of an up-close view. […]

The Night of Chicken, Roses and Sugar

For me, the Mets are rarely if ever on the periphery. Most nights they’re front and center. But now and then even they have to share space with other pursuits.

We’re finishing up three weeks in my folks’ summer cottage in Maine, an annual visit extended this year as an experiment in remote work and escaping […]

Born Under a K Sign

Max Scherzer pitched seven innings of shutout ball on his 38th birthday. Of course he did. He was born to put up zeroes on the night of July 27 in the borough of Queens before a sold-out house in attendance to cheer on a first-place team. It was foretold when he first drew breath and […]

The Fire Inside

The temperature was in the 80s. The energy was out of the ’80s. I needed neither a weatherman nor a meter reader to know which way the wind was blowing or how much the juice was flowing. It didn’t take a meteorology degree to discern it was a warm summer day. You didn’t have to […]

No. 17, Up Where It Belongs

1. The Mets ran this ticket special in the 1980s that was incredibly successful. For the price of one admission, you could see the most fearsome competitor in the game, a peerless clutch hitter and first base play that was as revolutionary as it was nonpareil. They were also willing into throw in for that […]

The Cycle of Life

On August 8, 1963, the day after Jim Hickman hit for the first cycle in Mets history, the Mets won again, 3-2, with first baseman Duke Carmel (one of two Dukes to play for the Mets that day at the Polo Grounds) hitting the deciding home run in the eighth inning. Between Carmel’s big blow […]

Fixing a Hole

Keith Hernandez filled the hole between the two and four spots in the batting order for seven Met seasons. He filled holes between himself and either the first base line or the second baseman on balls that seemed destined for the outfield. He filled the hole in the knowledge base of one promising young pitcher […]

Shifts in Thinking

The Mets were supposed to be off Monday night, but instead they wound up in D.C., playing another one of their COVID makeup dates. Jerad Eickhoff was ambushed by the crazed baseball-destroying cyborg formerly known as Kyle Schwarber and the Mets continued to espouse their philosophy of nonviolence at the plate and before you knew […]